PETS in real time: data mining and privacy

27 July 2011

I am currently sitting at the PETS 2011 symposium in Waterloo, CA. I will be blogging about selected papers (depending on the sessions I attend) over the next couple of days — authors and other participants are welcome to comment!

The first session is about data mining and privacy.

“How Unique and Traceable are Usernames?”
Daniele Perito, Claude Castelluccia, Mohamed Ali Kaafar, and Pere Manils (INRIA)

The first paper looks at the identifiably of on-line usernames. The authors looked at user names from different sites and assess the extent to which they can be linked together, as well as link them to a real person. Interestingly they used Google Profiles as ground truth, since they allow users to provide links to other accounts. First they assess the uniqueness of pseudonyms based on a probabilistic model: a k-th order markov chain is used to compute the probability of each pseudonym, and its information content (i.e. -log_2 P(username)). The authors show that most of the usernames observed have “high entropy” and should therefore be linkable.

The second phase of the analysis looks at usernames from different services, and attempts to link them even given small modifications to the name. The key dataset used was 300K google profiles, that list (sometimes — they used 10K tuples of usernames) other accounts as well. They then show that the Levenshtein distance (i.e. edit distance) of usernames from the same person is small compared to the distance of two random user names. A classifier is built, based on a threshold of the probabilistic Levenshtein distance, to assess whether a pair of usernames belongs to the same or a different user. The results seem good: about 50% of usernames are linkable with no mistakes.

So what are the interesting avenues for future work here? First, the analysis used is a simple threshold on the edit distance metric. It would be surprising if more advanced classifiers could not be applied to the task. I would definitely try to use random forests for the same task. Second, the technique can be used for good not evil: as users try to migrate between services, they need an effective way to find their contacts — maybe the proposed techniques can help with that.

“Text Classification for Data Loss Prevention” (any public PDF?)
Michael Hart (Symantec Research Labs), Pratyusa Manadhata (HP Labs), and Rob Johnson (Stony Brook University)

The paper looks at the automatic classification of documents as sensitive or not. This is to assist “data loss prevention” systems, that raise an alarm when personal data is about to be leaked (i.e. when it is about to be emailed or stored on-line — mostly by mistake). Traditionally DLP try to describe what is confidential through a set of simple rules, that are not expressive enough to describe and find what is confidential — thus the authors present a machine learning approach to automatically classify documents using training data as sensitive or not. As with all ML techniques there is a fear of mistakes: the technique described tries to minimise errors when it comes to classifying company media (ie. public documents) and internet documents, to prevent the system getting on the way of day to day business activities.

The results were rather interesting: the first SVN classifier looked at unigrams with binary weights to classify documents. Yet, it first had a very high rate of false positives for public documents. It seems the classifiers also had a tendency to classify documents as “secret”. A first solution was to supplement the training set with public documents (from wikipedia), to best described “what is public”. Second, the classifier was tweaked to (in a rather mysterious way to me) by “pushing the decision boundary closer to the true negative”. A further step does 3-category classification as secret, public and non-enterprise, rather than just secret and not-secret.

Overall: They manage to get the false positive / false negative rate down to less than 2%-3% on the largest datasets evaluated. That is nice. The downside of the approach, is common to most work that I have seen using SVNs. It requires a lot of manual tweaking, and further it does not really make much sense — it is possible to evaluate how well the technique performs on a test corpus, but difficult to tell why it works, or what makes it good or better than other approaches. As a resut, even early positive resutls should be considered as preliminary until more extensive evaluation is done (more like medicine rather than engineering). I would personally like to see a probabilistic model based classifier on similar features that integrates the two-step classification process into one model, to really understand what is going on — but then I tend to have a Baysian bias.

P3CA: Private Anomaly Detection Across ISP Networks
Shishir Nagaraja (IIIT Delhi) and Virajith Jalaparti, Matthew Caesar, and Nikita Borisov (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign)

The final paper in the session looks at privacy preserving intrusion detection to enable cooperation between internet service providers. ISPs would like to pool data from their networks to detect attacks: either because the volume of communications is abnormal at certain times, or because some frequency component is odd. Cooperation between multiple ISPs is important, but this cooperation should not leak volumes of traffic at each IPS since they are a commercial secret.

Technically, privacy of computations is achieved by using two semi-trusted entities, a coordinator and key holder. All ISPs encrypt their traffic under an additive homomorphic scheme (Paillier) under the keyholder key, and send it to the coordinator. The coordinator is using the key-holder as an oracle to perform a PCA computation to output the top-n eighen vectors and values of traffic. The cryptographic techniques are quite but standard, and involve doing additions, subtraction, multiplication, comparison and normalization of matrices privately though a joint private two-party computation.

Surprisingly, the performance of the scheme is quite good! Using a small cluster, can process a few tens of time slots from hundresds of different ISPs in tens of minutes. A further incremental algorithm allows on-line computations of eighen vector/value pairs in seconds — making real-time use of the privacy preserving algorithm possible (5 minutes of updates takes about 10 seconds to process).

This is a surprising result: my intuition would be that the matrix multiplication would make the approach impractically slow. I would be quite interested to compare the implementation and algorithm used here with a general MPC compiler (under the same honest-but-curious model).

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One Response to “PETS in real time: data mining and privacy”

  1. anonymous said

    I am also attending the PETS and this is an awesome work you’re doing here both for the people attending and for those who were not able to come and enjoy this nice event

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