How to track mobile IP addresses of specific users (PETS14 in real time)

16 July 2014

(The first session of PETS2014 deal with privacy for mobile devices. )

The paper “Exploiting Delay Patterns for User IPs Identification in Cellular Networks” observes that a significant number of mobile operators (over 50% of the market in North America and over 30% in Europe) assign public and routable IP addresses to mobile devices. That opens the devices to denial of service attacks, resource depletion, etc. But how can an adversary find the IP address of a specific user? If the adversary can observe a large fraction of the network this may be easy. The paper shows that even a small entity — like a single user — may track a specific user’s IP.

The tracking attack uses specificities of how mobile devices use the cell network. It turns out that the network stack may be in different states: “Idle”, “cell dispatch” or “cell fetch”, to conserve battery. Most of the time a device is in “Idle”. The authors notice that the push notification of IM services allows for indirectly injecting delay patterns on a target device. To receive the notification the device goes to a high everge reception / transmission state and for a time window (of 10-15 sec) the latency to reach the device drops. An adversary may use this insight to identify the IP of a device associated with an IM identifier.

So the attack methodology goes as follows: the attacker send an IM message, lowering the latency of the target device. Then they scan a range of devices by IP to detect if the latency is compatible with the hypothesis it has received a push notification. If not, the IP may be excluded. The attack is repeated a number of times to gain increasing certainty about the exact address of the target. Graphs suggest that about 10-20 iterations the space of possible device IPs becomes significantly smaller. However, for best result the repeated probes should be spread quite a few minutes apart. However, there is still some confusion between the target device and devices that always transmit. Eliminating those further improves the accuracy of the attack.

Simple countermeasures involve either firewalling devices to make it difficult to reach them, or use IPv6 making the space of possible addresses to scan unfeasibly large.

 

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