Teaching Privacy Enhancing Technologies at UCL

30 June 2015

Last term I had the opportunity and pleasure to prepare and teach the first course on Privacy Enhancing Technologies (PETs) at University College London, as part of the MSc in Information Security.

The course covers principally, and in some detail, engineering aspects of PETs and caters for an audience of CS / engineering students that already understands the basics of information security and cryptography (although these are not hard prerequisites). Students were also provided with a working understanding of legal and compliance aspects of data protection regimes, by guest lecturer Prof. Eleni Kosta (Tilburg); as well as a world class introduction to human aspects of computing and privacy, by Prof. Angela Sasse (UCL). This security & cryptographic engineering focus sets this course apart from related courses.

The taught part of the course runs for 20 hours over 10 weeks, split in 10 topics:

Most importantly the course includes 10 hours of labs (20 next year!), split into 5 exercises, that give students (and their teachers!) hands on experience implementing extremely advanced privacy enhancing technologies. More generally the course provides an introduction to solid cryptographic engineering, test-driven development, testing & QA tools and code audits. The programming language used was Python on a Linux environment, with the petlib library that was specially developed for this course.

For each lab exercise students in pairs were provided with a partial code file, and a set of unit tests, and were asked to fill in the remaining code to fulfill the task, and at least make the unit tests pass. The topics of the exercises track the first 5 lecture topics:

Finally, part of the grading was based on students performing a code review of other groups, looking for code defects leading to security or other bugs.

Overall, I am very proud of the progress everyone made. The course was attended by 16 MSc student and 2 MEng students. Everyone eventually was able to complete all lab assignment — not a given considering the advanced nature of the tasks at hand. It was evident while discussing with student the final exercise, on building a selective disclosure credential, that many had developed an intuitive understanding of how to build solutions based on zero-knowledge protocols, and all had definitely overcome their initial fear of these more advanced concepts in PETs.

I was also very impressed with many students that were able to tackle the hardest questions in the exam. One of those questions, basically asked students to re-invent a variant of the privacy preserving genomic testing protocol we presented at WPES 2014 — and many did successfully. Similarly, they were asked to de-anonymize a mechanism very similar to the 15:15 rule in place in California to “protect” smart meter reading, and again many did so successfully under time constrain and the high pressure environment of exams. As ever, the great engagement from students was the most rewarding part of teaching the course.

All material is available online (see links to slides, and git repositories), and I would be delighted to share / receive any additional exercises by others finding this material relevant to their courses.

Advertisements

3 Responses to “Teaching Privacy Enhancing Technologies at UCL”

  1. Dan said

    Hmm… have you ever considered bringing this up to coursera or edx? From that brief description it seems like a perfect candidate – especially the part on grading based on student’s code review: nice way to scale to thousands students taking the course simultaneously.

  2. […] (Original post on George’s blog conspicuous chatter) […]

  3. […] (Original post on George’s blog: Conspicuous Chatter) […]

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: